Sexual Assault Climate Survey Results

October 2015

As part of Indiana University’s comprehensive commitment to effectively addressing the issue of sexual assault, all students on the IU Bloomington campus were invited in November 2014 to complete a climate survey on sexual assault and related issues.

IU Bloomington’s Community Attitudes and Experiences with Sexual Assault Survey asked students about their attitudes, perceptions and direct experiences with sexual assault, as well as their opinions on the university resources and practices related to preventing and dealing with instances of sexual misconduct.

The results set forth in this report were compiled from the 7,132 students who completed at least 50 percent of the survey, representing 17 percent of the total student population. Sixteen percent of undergraduates and 20 percent of graduate students participated, and in nominal terms, 72 percent of the participants were undergraduates and 28 percent were graduate students. Sixty-two percent were women and 38 percent were men.

In many ways, findings from this survey were consistent with those from similar studies at other universities and released in recent months. They also confirm the vital importance of continued vigilance on the part of the university, students and the community at large in combatting this serious issue, which is affecting a significant number of college students—both while they are attending college and before they arrive on campus.

In that spirit, the information gathered through this survey has already been, and will continue to be, used to inform the university’s ongoing prevention, education and response efforts, and to move us closer to the ultimate goal of eliminating sexual violence that affects our campus community.

Key Findings

  • 17 percent of the undergraduate women and 6 percent of the graduate women participants reported experiencing attempted or completed nonconsensual sexual penetration while at IU. About 2 percent of undergraduate men and 1 percent of graduate men participants reported experiencing attempted or completed nonconsensual sexual penetration while at IU.
     
  • 16 percent of the undergraduate women participants reported experiencing attempted or completed nonconsensual sexual penetration before coming to IU.
     
  • 29 percent of the undergraduate women and nearly 8 percent of undergraduate men participants reported experiencing some form of nonconsensual sexual touching while at IU, on par with the percentage of undergraduate women and men who experienced some form of nonconsensual sexual touching before coming to IU.
     
  • 35 percent of the undergraduate women and 34 percent of the graduate women participants reported being the victims of some form of sexual harassment while at IU.
     
  • 86 percent of the undergraduate women and 85 percent of the graduate women participants who reported experiencing some form of nonconsensual sexual contact did not report the incident to anyone at IU.
     
  • Among the undergraduate women participants who did not report incidents of completed or attempted nonconsensual sexual penetration, 45 percent said the incident was not “serious enough to disclose to others.” 29 percent of graduate women participants reported similarly.
     
  • Alcohol and/or drug use by one party or both was present in between 60 and 83 percent of the incidents of reported sexual misconduct.
     
  • Among the undergraduate women participants who reported being sexually assaulted at IU, 23 percent said the incident occurred on campus (in a residence hall, outside or in other location); 23 percent at a fraternity or sorority house or event; and nearly half occurred at an off-campus location such as a residence, event, bar, club or restaurant.
     
  • 50 percent of all student participants indicated that they felt they could play a role in curbing sexual violence on campus.
     
  • 67 percent of the undergraduate women and 70 percent of graduate women participants said they feel safe on the IU campus.
     
  • 52 percent of the undergraduate women participants feel IU officials should do more to protect students from harm.
     
Read the whole report Read the letter from the president and provost Read the news release