Federal Laws

These U.S. laws address sexual violence. To learn more, explore Title IX and additional federal resources, and get to know IU policies and key terms.

Title IX and Title IV

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex against any person in education programs and activities receiving federal funding.

"No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance."

Students have the right to pursue education, including athletic programs, scholarships, and other activities, free from sex discrimination, including sexual violence and harassment. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. § 1681 et seq.) requires schools that receive federal financial assistance to take necessary steps to prevent sexual assault on their campuses, and to respond promptly and effectively when an assault is reported.

Title IV of the 1964 Civil Rights Act (42 U.S.C. § 2000c et seq.) also requires public schools to respond to sexual assaults committed against their students.

The Clery Act

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (20 USC § 1092(f)), commonly referred to as the Clery Act, requires colleges and universities that participate in federal financial aid programs to report annual statistics on crime on or near their campuses—including sexual assault and rape—and to develop and disseminate prevention policies.

The Violence Against Women Act

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) established federal legal definitions of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

The Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act (Campus SaVE)

The Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act (Campus SaVE) was enacted in March 2013, and amends the Jeanne Clery Act, creating additional protections for victims of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking, as well as creating more prescriptive requirements for prevention and awareness programs related to these offenses.

Federal Resources

U.S. Department of Education Office of Civil Rights


Information about Title IX

U.S. Department of Justice: Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Sex in Federally Assisted Programs


Information about Title IX

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission: Sexual Harassment

Federal sexual harassment law